About Hemp
Hemp is a strain of the Cannabis sativa plant species that is grown specifically for the industrial uses of its derived products. Hemp is related to marijuana, another strain of Cannabis sativa, but hemp contains only very low concentrations (less than 0.3%) of the compound tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive compound that marijuana is known for. Hemp can be refined into over 25,000 different uses.

Hemp is a fast-growing plant crop in which the whole of the plant is harvested and put to use. It was one of the first plants turned into usable fiber 10,000 years ago and today commercial uses of hemp include paper, textiles, clothing, biodegradable plastics, cement, paint, insulation, biofuel, food, and animal feed. Hemp oil from the seeds can be used in the manufacture of oil-based paints, in creams as a moisturizing agent, for cooking, and in plastics. Hemp seeds are also used in health foods, organic body care, and other nutraceuticals. Hemp contains over 100 different compounds or cannabinoids, of which cannabidiol (CBD) is currently the most popular and sold for a variety of end-uses.